Trine 3 Review

Trine 3: The Artifacts of Power is the third installment in the Trine series which brings back the three heroes to solve physics based puzzles and defeat evil enemy hordes.

Except for a few sections of the game, you will always have access to the three heroes to use at any time. Each has a different set of skills they can use to solve puzzles and you can switch between them whenever you want. The knight is the hero that will be used most often during combat because of his shield and sword, but he is also useful for using his shield to glide across gaps. The wizard has almost no offensive capabilities, but he has the useful skill of creating boxes at will and levitating around objects in the world. The thief is also good during combat using her bow, but the best part about her is the rope she can shoot out to swing across pits and use it to pull on objects.

Levels in Trine have a main linear path that has many optional areas along it, all involving physics puzzles and Trineangles to collect. Puzzles can involve putting an object on a switch, platforms that move around based on what you do to them, rings to swing around on, and many other types. Other than puzzles, you will occasionally run into enemies that you will need to fight. There are also challenge levels that only let you play as one character and have much harder puzzles to do than normal levels, or sometimes just require you to defeat a few waves of enemies. Normal levels can also be played with up to two other players, each playing as one of the three heroes. There is a level editor that anyone can use that allows you to create levels that you can also share on the Steam Workshop for others to try out.

There is very little difficulty in the game, and you’re spending more time trying to get the physics to work than actually figuring out how to complete a puzzle. It may become slightly challenging when you must collect more trineangles to unlock later levels, but there are enough of them to not require perfecting each level. If you’re taking your time and trying to collect everything in the levels, you will probably spend up to 30 minutes per level. Levels can actually be completed very quickly if you don’t bother with the optional parts of levels and just want to play for the story.

Collecting everything in every level is about as hard as the game can get, but the actual collecting isn’t hard most of the time, you just have to figure out where they’re located. There are a few challenge levels to complete, but they aren’t particularly difficult either. The game will take you up to 4 hours to complete, and that includes doing most optional levels and spending time looking for trineangles in the levels. It is a rather short game. All the basics are available to change, such as volume, controls, graphics, and subtitles.

The game is graphically standard in terms of 3D models, but the game does have a very bright and colorful look to it. It does run well with everything maxed out except for anti-aliasing, which slows the game down to a crawl on a fairly high end computer. As long as you turn down anti-aliasing, you will more than likely be able to run it. There is already a good amount of sound in Trine 3. Each level has music playing in the background, there are sound effects for most objects, and the characters have voices along with a narrator.

I have previously only played the first Trine game, which I liked, and never experienced any of the second one. It is the first game in the series where you can move around in a 3D environment instead of just 2D, but so far this doesn’t seem to add much to the game, but isn’t too much of a hindrance either. The game also felt much simpler, easier, and lacking depth that the first one had. In particular, there are no longer items to equip and find in levels, there are no bonus abilities to upgrade or unlock, and enemies are no challenge at all. The game itself isn’t terrible, but it doesn’t feel very good when you look at the price and compare it to the previous titles.

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